WHY CANADA PAY MORE FOR YOUR JOB – Find out more

Canada has a strong and dynamic economy and can be a great place to do business. Much like other developed nations, the country is dominated by the service industry making up nearly 75% of its workforce.

Canada’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of $1.74 trillion in 2019 was only around eight percent of the GDP of its primary trading partner, the United States. Despite this, Canada remains one of the world’s wealthiest countries and is estimated to be the tenth largest global economy. Its growth rate was forecast to remain stable at around 1.7% for 2020, prior to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Approximately 90 percent of workers in Canada are protected by the unique employment laws of their province or territory. The other 10 percent – which includes many in industries such as broadcasting and banking – are protected by the federal labour standards that define required employment conditions.

Since immigration in Canada is an area of shared federal and provincial responsibility, companies’ ability to hire foreign workers depends on the location in which they operate.

For all employees aged 18 to 70, employers in Canada are required to withhold Canada Pension Plan (CPP) contributions and Employment Insurance (EI) premiums. However, those operating in Quebec contribute to the Quebec Pension Plan (QPP). Those contributions are deducted from wages, salaries, bonuses, commissions and any advances from payroll, among other sources.

PAY RATES

According to Statistics Canada, the average wage for Canadian employees is currently $952 per week – or just under $50,000 a year. Most of the jobs on our high-paying list earn at least three times that much (And the lowest paying occupations pay less than half the average).

The highest paying jobs in Canada:

  1. Federal judges -$308,600- $396,700
  2. Specialist physicians – $117,00-$375,000
  3. Senior managers in Finance and Communications – $77,805 – $129,629
  4. Senior managers of Goods Production, Utilities, Transportation, and Construction – $75,159 – $141,569
  5. Engineering managers – $68,100-$172,000
  6. Family physicians – $58,015 – $310,054
  7. Dentist – $53,805 – $213,671
  8. Lawyers – $48,630 – $146,431
  9. Actuaries – $45,820 – $129,740
  10. Airline pilots – $35,233 – $146,274

The lowest paying jobs in Canada:

Most of the lowest paying jobs will simply pay the minimum wage of whatever region the job happens to be located in. Towards the low end of the scale that is roughly $9.95 an hour earning someone just over $20,000; assuming they worked full time and were paid for 40 hours a week.

  1. Sewing machine operator – $22,514 – $41,546
  2. Food and beverage server – $22,360 – $30,369
  3. Dishwasher – $21,286 – $28,540
  4. Food counter attendant / kitchen help – $21,184 – $32,888
  5. Cashier – $21,183 – $29,156
  6. Restaurant host/hostess – $21,113 – $29,120
  7. Service station attendant – $21,052 – $32,357
  8. Cook, fast food – $20,994 – $26,026
  9. Babysitters, nannies, and parent’s helpers – $20,880 – $37,354
  10. Bartender -$20,091 – $42,837

 

Find the job that suits your career.

https://www.payscale.com/research/CA/Country=Canada/Salary

https://www.indeed.ca/